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Understanding Your Test Results

 

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Pap test results: 
Result What it Means?
Normal No cell changes were found on your cervix. You have a very low risk of developing cervical pre-cancer or cancer in the next 3 years.

Your doctor may suggest a repeat Pap test in 1-3 years. 
ASC-US (Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance) Your cells are not "typical". If it was not caused by a high-risk HPV infection, you have a very low risk of developing cervical disease or pre-cancer. 

Your doctor may suggest that you have a repeat Pap test. Or your doctor may use the original sample taken from the Pap test to conduct an HPV test to further determine if you have an HPV infection. This will help determineif you should have colposcopy, a repeat Pep test or other follow-up. 
LSIL (Low-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion) Minor cell changes were found on your cervix and you have an increased risk of cervical pre-cancer or cancer. 

Your doctor may suggest that you have colposcopy, or your doctor may use the same sample taken for Pap to conduct an HPV test to further determine if you have an HPV infection. This will help determine if you should have colposcopy, a repeat Pap test or other follow-up.
HSIL (High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion) Serious cell changes have occurred on your cervix and you have a significantly increased risk of cervical pre-cancer or cancer. 

Your doctor may suggest that you have colposcopy.
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HPV test results*:
Result What it Means?
Negative   HPV infection was not identified. You have a very low risk of developing cervical pre-cancer or cancer in the next 5 years.  

Your doctor may suggest a repeat HPV test in 3-7 years.
Positive You have a high-risk HPV infection and have an increased risk of cervical pre-cancer or cancer. 

Your doctor may suggest re-testing you for HPV in a year as most HPV infections resolve on their own. Or your doctor may use the original sample taken for the HPV test to determine if you have an HPV16 or HPV18 infection. (See below "Positive for HPV16 or HPV18").
Positive for HPV 16 or HPV 18 You have a high-risk HPV infection with one of the highest risk HPV types and have significantly increased risk of cervical pre-cancer and cancer.

Your doctor may suggest that you have colposcopy.

*Many HPV tests offer only a yes/no answer for all high-risk HPV types combined, which include HPV 16 and HPV 18. So a positive test result from these tests only indicates if you have an infection from any one of the high-risk HPV types, and will not report the results for the highest risk HPV 16 and HPV 18 separately. The cobas® HPV Test from Roche gives separate results for HPV 16 and HPV 18 in addition to a group of 12 other high-risk HPV types together, to provide you and your doctor more information on your risk of cervical cancer. It is helpful to get the results for HPV 16 and HPV 18 separately, so you will know if you have one of the highest risk types.

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Pap and HPV testing* (co-test) results
Results What it Means?
Pap normal and HPV negative No cell changes were found on your cervix and HPV infection was not identified. You have an extremely low risk of developing cervical pre-cancer or cancer in the next 5 years.

Your doctor may suggest to repeat Pap and HPV testing (co-test) in 3-7 years. 
Pap ASC-US and HPV negative Your cells are not "typical". Since this was not caused by a high-risk HPV infection, you have a very low risk of developing cervical pre-cancer or cancer.

Your doctor may suggest to repeat Pap and HPV testing (co-test) in the future or other follow-up.
Pap LSIL and HPV negative Minor cell changes were found on your cervix and you have an increased risk of cervical pre-cancer or cancer. 

Your doctor may suggest to repeat Pap and HPV testing (co-test) in one year or to have colposcopy.
HSIL and either HPV negative or HPV positive Serious cell changes were found on your cervix and you have a significantly increased risk of cervical pre-cancer or cancer. 

Your doctor may suggest for you to have colposcopy.
Pap normal and HPV positive No cell changes were found on your cervix, however you have a high-risk HPV infection and have increased risk of cervical pre-cancer and cancer. 

Your doctor may suggest a repeat Pap and HPV test (co-test) in a year as most HPV infections resolve on their own. Or your doctor may use the original sample taken to determine if you have an HPV16 or HPV18 infection. If you test positive, you have significantly increased risk of cervical pre-cancer and cancer and your doctor may suggest that you have colposcopy.
Pap ASC-US and HPV positive Your cells are not "typical" and you have a high-risk HPV infection. You have significantly increased risk of cervical pre-cancer and cancer.

Your doctor may suggest to proceed to colposcopy immediately.